Tag Archives: Clovis culture

No Bullwinkle

On Twilight Beasts you will hopefully have seen some of the amazing mummified animals of the Pleistocene. Some of these mummies may even be like old familiar friends to you: the woolly mammoths Lyuba, Buttercup, Khroma, Dima, Yuka, and Mascha, … Continue reading

Posted in Extinction, Irish Elk, moose, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Clovis hunting an African elephant

One of the advantages of having entered academia after the internet revolution is that the majority of my library is virtual. My laptop PDF paper collection is currently at 6,554 items (and there are another 1,500 or so waiting to … Continue reading

Posted in Clovis hunters | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

“Nice Beaver!”

Childhood stories probably influence how we see familiar creatures. If someone talks about beavers, I think about Narnian beavers. In the delightful C. S Lewis book The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, the good beavers have cozy homes, make … Continue reading

Posted in Giant Beaver | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Paddington’s dangerous cousin

North and South America were the last continents to be conquered by humans. We have been in Africa since we first evolved, Europe and Asia for over a million years, in Australia for about 60,000 years, but in the Americas … Continue reading

Posted in Short Faced Bear | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 101 Comments

The lolloping shovel mouth

My first introduction to gomphotheres was a research critique of a seminal Quaternary paper by Janzen in ‘Science’ journal. Something about these peculiar and ungainly looking distant cousins of today’s noble elephant fascinated me! Everyone has of course heard of woolly … Continue reading

Posted in Gompothere | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

The Nipple Tooth

  In the everyday language of superlatives “mammoth” and “mastodon” are used almost interchangeably. Yet, despite superficial similarities due to homology through shared ancestry, the animals could not be more different. Mastodons are known from both the old world and … Continue reading

Posted in Mastodon | Tagged , , , , , , , | 18 Comments